annerocious:

everlxrk:

memoirsofatrichotillomaniac:

A zombie-bitten father tries to save his infant daughter in this bittersweet short film

So you’ve been bitten by a zombie. So long, conscious brain activity, hello craving for human meat. But the protagonist of the short film Cargo has bigger problems than his impending demise: he has to find a way to save his infant daughter, even if he has to die first to do it.

Directed by Ben Howling and Yolanda Ramke, Cargo was a finalist in Tropfest Australia 2013. It’s also a rather clever take on zombie genre tropes, with a story that isn’t about the survival of self, but the survival of another.

When I saw him walking with the balloon I lost it

Completely lost it

OMG why?!

Do you think you need dialogue? You do not need dialogue.

Music videos can illustrate emotion through nuance: a knowing glance, a touch, a gesture.

The best “little movies” read equally well without the music, particularly without the lyrics, which is akin to dialogue in a screenplay for me. Watch this without the volume to see the story told in pictures.

Screenwriters read screenplays - J. J. Abrams

lifeascaty:

J. J. Abrams is an American screenwriter, producer and director. He is known for both TV and film, including Lost, Fringe, Super 8, Armageddon and Star Trek Into Darkness. He is currently directing Star Wars: Episode VII.

Alias (2001)

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Armageddon (1998)

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Fringe (2008)

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Lost (2004)

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Super 8 (2011)

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Watch J. J. Abrams at TED.

See the rest of my screenplay collection here.

(via freelance-anthem)

johnrezas:

"Something that you should take particular notice of is the fact that the best scripts have very few explanatory passages. Adding explanation to the descriptive passages of a screenplay is the most dangerous trap you can fall into. It’s easy to explain the psychological state of a character at a particular moment, but it’s very difficult to describe it through the delicate nuances of action and dialogue. Yet it is not impossible. A great deal about this can be learned from the study of the great plays, and I believe the ‘hard-boiled’ detective novels can also be very instructive." — Akira Kurosawa

johnrezas:

"Something that you should take particular notice of is the fact that the best scripts have very few explanatory passages. Adding explanation to the descriptive passages of a screenplay is the most dangerous trap you can fall into. It’s easy to explain the psychological state of a character at a particular moment, but it’s very difficult to describe it through the delicate nuances of action and dialogue. Yet it is not impossible. A great deal about this can be learned from the study of the great plays, and I believe the ‘hard-boiled’ detective novels can also be very instructive." — Akira Kurosawa

(via freelance-anthem)

evagronka:

Catherine Deneuve (Pointing & Anger), c. 1965

(via iwanttobelikearollingstone)

17272dorsetave:

10 Tips to Avoid Clichés in Writing

by Peter Selgin

Avoid Stolen or Borrowed Tales

Most sensational subjects have been treated to death. Result: a minefield of clichés. And, as novelist Martin Amis tells us, good writing is a “war against cliché.” The story’s problems might be partially redeemed by crisp dialogue, vivid descriptions and an impeccable edgy style—but the plain fact is, they shouldn’t be solved.

Turn a Stereotype on its Head

The real problem with clichés is that they deprive us of genuine details, which, though less sensational, are both more convincing and more interesting. A deeper look into the life of any artist will reveal facts that have it over all clichés.

The truth is the best weapon we have for authenticity and against cliché: Whether it’s the literal truth or the truth of imagination doesn’t matter.

Tell the Story Only You Can Tell

When we produce stories that are derivative, we’re not being honest with ourselves. We’re borrowing someone else’s aesthetics and selling them as our own.

In choosing intrinsically sensational subjects, writers think they’re getting a free—or a cheap—ride. But as with most things in life, you tend to get what you pay for.

The best way to avoid cliché is to practice sincerity. If we’ve come by sensational material honestly, through our own personal experience or imagination, we may rightly claim it as our own. Otherwise, we’d best steer clear. Our stories should be stories that only we can tell, as only we can tell them.

Keep it Real by Taking it Slow

Far worse than rushing, in trying to interest us, most writers abandon sincerity and, with it, authenticity. They choose sensational subjects on the basis of little personal knowledge and no genuine emotional investment. They do so on the assumption that their own stories aren’t interesting enough, that what they have to offer isn’t suitably “sensational.” In fact, every human is in some way unique, and this in itself makes us each “sensational” in our own ways.

In pretending to be anyone other than themselves, writers sacrifice the very thing we most crave from them: authenticity.

Rescue Gratuitous Scenes From Melodramatic Action

Overly convenient subjects are prone not only to cliché, but to melodrama.

We call a story or a scene melodramatic when its protagonists are too obviously heroes or victims and its antagonists are obviously villains.

Fight Overly Convenient Plot Points With Authenticity

Melodrama is to authentic drama what “crab sticks” are to the real thing: an inferior substitute.

Sometimes the mere piling on of sensational events results in melodrama. Another result of cramming too much drama into too few pages is a paucity of authenticating detail, the sort of small, precise, carefully chosen and calibrated descriptions that help suspend a reader’s disbelief and make it possible to enjoy a story no matter how unlikely or outrageous.

By slowing down and taking the time and trouble to imbue our stories with authentic, rich, specific moments and details, we achieve real drama and avoid its floozy cousins, sentimentality and melodrama.

Curb Melodrama with Substance

When a relationship is “dramatized,” nearly all of the dialogue is head-on and histrionic, vomiting up plot and backstory. Accusations and apologies are served up along with great gobs of personal history.

A more dramatic, less histrionic approach would convey the status quo between characters up front, through exposition, leaving subsequent scenes free to explore behavior and character. We read the story to see how these characters will cope (or not) with each other under specific circumstances.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Tell the story only you can tell, keep it slow, and write authentically. Perfect advice.

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“The problem isn’t coming up with ideas, it is how to contain the invasion. My ideas are like uninvited guests. They don’t knock on the door; they climb in through the windows like burglars who show up in the middle of the night and make a racket in the kitchen as they raid the fridge. I don’t sit and ponder which one I should deal with first. The one to be wrestled to the floor before all others is the one coming at me with the most vehemence.”