fenway03:

This list includes some of my fav movie & screenwriting podcasts. (Right-click on the podcast name to copy the link and add it to iTunes.) Got any additional recommendations?

On the Page: Screenwriting – Hosted by Pilar Alessandra, this weekly podcast is all about the…

lifeascaty:

writerlyn:

Exactly what it says on the tin.

Spiffy

Scripts! Scripts! Scripts!

(via screenandscripts)

carmineredcarmine:

Vatican Museum Guard

You can neither run nor hide from time.

There’s a story there. Somewhere.

I would love input on this!

While waiting to load the rented Jag onto the huge Ferry from Belfast to Cairnryan (because we were traveling with “senior” parents, we had paid for “priority” boarding and were near the head of the queue to board), we noticed the Garda walking the lines of cars in their blue police hats and yellow slickers with reflective stripes. They had a black lab on a lead as they wended through the rows of cars in “general” boarding. The dog took particular interest in a small SUV with two guys who looked about 30 or so that appeared to be tourists. The Garda stood patiently with the dog while the men exited the vehicle and opened the rear hatch for the officers. The dog jumped in the back, sniffed around, jumped out of the car, and went to the rear passenger’s side door. The officer opened the door, and the dog jumped in. The man in the yellow safety vest signaled to the cars in the front of the line, and we began to move, leaving the scene behind. 

This really happened, and it was so exemplarily visual that I want to build an entire screenplay on the incident. 

So, I have a few questions to determine what happens next:

1) Who were the two men in the SUV?

2) Where were they coming from?

3) What, if anything, did the Garda and the dog find?

4) What did we miss after we boarded the ferry?

5) What kind of “twist” can the middle-aged folks with their elderly parents in the Jag furnish?

6) Most importantly, did you get a good “visual” from the above passage?

happycurator:

britishfilminstitute:

Happy World Cat Day! Celebrate with our list of 10 great films featuring felines.

Anita Ekberg in La Dolce Vita

theeraserhead:

"I prefer to be subcultural rather than mass-cultural. I’m not interested in hitting the vein of the mainstream." - Jim Jarmusch.

theeraserhead:

"I prefer to be subcultural rather than mass-cultural. I’m not interested in hitting the vein of the mainstream." - Jim Jarmusch.

(via iwanttobelikearollingstone)

Longford to Dublin via the Royal Canal

tribecafilm:

Sharon’s Shorts: ‘Noreen’ by Domhnall Gleeson

The About Time/Harry Potter actor directs his father, Brendan Gleeson, in this hysterical short about two cops that discover a dead body in a cottage and get more than they bargained for.

great short film from Domhnall Gleeson and company

justlouisabeinglouisa:

Hey, I’m about to embark on a mini-documentary, but have not attempted anything like this (this large) before!

QUESTIONS

1. The documentary is about mental health and my own personal experiences through therapy, how much fact vs experience should I include as a…

Regarding Point #1: Representing the mental illness theme authentically and with subtlety, rather than over-the-top madness, could be very effective. Factual portrayal is important to savvy film goers - especially those with professional or personal experience. Good luck!