lifeascaty:

If you’re a fan of Joss Whedon then you’ll probably want to check this out. If you’re not a fan of Joss Whedon, you should still check this out. (Jeanine Basinger taught Joss Whedon while he was at Wesleyan University. You can read more about their continued relationship here.)

Anyway, you can…

heidisaman:

"Something that you should take particular notice of is the fact that the best scripts have very few explanatory passages. Adding explanation to the descriptive passages of a screenplay is the most dangerous trap you can fall into. It’s easy to explain the psychological state of a character at a particular moment, but it’s very difficult to describe it through the delicate nuances of action and dialogue. Yet it is not impossible. A great deal about this can be learned from the study of the great plays, and I believe the ‘hard-boiled’ detective novels can also be very instructive.”

— Akira Kurosawa on what makes a good script

Still from Seven Samurai (1954, dir. Akira Kurosawa)

This could be so useful in screenwriting or directing.
shortergirl:

emyrys:

gryzio:

theinformationdump:

Body Language Cheat Sheet for Writers
As described by Selnick’s article:

Author and doctor of clinical psychology Carolyn Kaufman has released a one-page body language cheat sheet of psychological “tells” (PDF link) fiction writers can use to dress their characters.


Very useful for artists as well! :>

Very useful in life, too. 

Yes on that tag,
emyrys
!!
This could be so useful in screenwriting or directing.
shortergirl:

emyrys:

gryzio:

theinformationdump:

Body Language Cheat Sheet for Writers
As described by Selnick’s article:

Author and doctor of clinical psychology Carolyn Kaufman has released a one-page body language cheat sheet of psychological “tells” (PDF link) fiction writers can use to dress their characters.


Very useful for artists as well! :>

Very useful in life, too. 

Yes on that tag,
emyrys
!!

This could be so useful in screenwriting or directing.

shortergirl:

emyrys:

gryzio:

theinformationdump:

Body Language Cheat Sheet for Writers

As described by Selnick’s article:

Author and doctor of clinical psychology Carolyn Kaufman has released a one-page body language cheat sheet of psychological “tells” (PDF link) fiction writers can use to dress their characters.

Very useful for artists as well! :>

Very useful in life, too. 

Yes on that tag,
emyrys
!!

(via peasantwisdom)

screenandscripts:

image

Screenwriters! Get your claws into this awesomely helpful list of screenwriting terms. Scribble them on post-it notes, make them into posters, tattoo them to your body, or simply favourite this post…

[Source: IdeasTap]

'Playwright and scriptwriter,

“You have to know human behaviour … And the quality of your writing is absolutely capped at your understanding of human behaviour. You’ll never write above what you know about people.”
Tony Gilroy (BAFTA/BFI Screenwriters Lecture)

So get out and live?

(via scriptanalytics)

People are talking.

While watching X Files episode 22 (1993), I realized it contained a kernel of the premise for Good Will Hunting (1997).

annerocious:

boazpriestly:

  • Over-explanation. This includes prologues. “Prologues are never needed. You can usually throw them in the garbage. They’re usually put on as a patch.”
  • Too much data. “You’re trying to seduce your reader, not burden them,” Friedman said.
  • Over-writing, or “trying too hard.” “We think the more description we add, the more vivid it will be; but we don’t want to be distracted from the story” we open the book for.
  • Beginning the novel with an interior monologue or reflection. Usually this is written as the thoughts of a character who is sitting alone, musing and thinking back on a story. Just start with the story.
  • Beginning the novel with a flashback. Friedman isn’t entirely anti-flashback, but the novel’s opening page is the wrong place for one.
  • Beginning a novel with the “waking up sequence” of a character waking, getting out of bed, putting on slippers, heading for the kitchen and coffee…a cliche
  • Related cliche: beginning the novel with an alarm clock or a ringing phone
  • Starting out with an “ordinary day’s routine” for the main character
  • Beginning with “crisis moments” that aren’t unique: “When the doctor said ‘malignant,’ my life changed forever…” or “The day my father left us I was seven years old…”
  • Don’t start with a dialogue that doesn’t have any context. Building characterization through dialogue is okay anywhere else but there.
  • Starting with backstory, or “going back, then going forward.”
  • Info dump. More formally called “exposition.”
  • Character dump, which is four or more characters on the first page.

Coincidentally….

13 common errors on a screenplay’s first page.

Except the one about dialogue and context. That’s fine.

“You go to Italy and you look at Michelangelo’s work, and there are people saying: “Come on, let’s go, I can’t stand it.” And it doesn’t lessen the achievement of what he has done. It just says that everyone is not going to be ensnared by your particular art, and I don’t think that’s an unhealthy thing. But American society says: wait a minute, if that happens you won’t get a chance to make another film, therefore you must make your films more accessible to people so that they will like it.
….
I think one thing is really apparent: a really good film will be accepted by the great majority of people. Not that there haven’t been good films. I just think that the approach to making films has been so chicken, because of the financial difficulty in raising money so that you won’t be in debt for the rest of your life.
….
Making a film is extremely expensive. The only way you can make one is by having a basic disrespect for money….”
— John Cassavetes, ‘75 (via mizoguchi-mane)

(via iwanttobelikearollingstone)